Black 3D Printer PC Filament 1.75mm Dimensional Accuracy +/- 0.05mm, 1KG Spool (2.2LBS), 3D Printing Polycarbonate Material

Diameter (Tolerance): 1.75 mm ±0.05 mm
Net Weight:1000g
Recommended Printing Temp: 245 – 265 °C
Recommended Printing Speed: 30 – 90 mm/s
Heated Bed:90 ~ 105 °C

Product Features

  • Heat resistant filament
  • Can withstand temperatures well above 110 °C.
  • Harder and Stronger than ABS filament

Check Out Our Website For Details…

LOOK: Adidas' 3D printed running shoes are a thing of alien beauty

The sports company is releasing their tech-forward Futurecraft 4D sneaker this week

Published 8:00 PM, January 15, 2018

Updated 10:41 PM, January 15, 2018

FUTURECRAFT 4D. Adidas is set to release the futuristic shoe on January 18. Photo from adidas.com

FUTURECRAFT 4D. Adidas is set to release the futuristic shoe on January 18. Photo from adidas.com

MANILA, Philippines – Adidas is set to release their much-awaited Futurecraft 4D sneaker in New York on January 18, ushering in a new age for footwear.

According to the brand, Futurecraft is the world’s first high performance running shoe with midsoles made out of light and oxygen using Digital Light Synthesis technology by Carbon, a tech company that specializes in the manufacturing of 3D printing technology.

The resulting shoe is one with an alien-esque midsole that looks like it was taken straight out of a science fiction novel.

FUTURECRAFT 4D MIDSOLE. The midsole was made with light and oxygen through cutting edge technology by Carbon. Photo from adidas.com

FUTURECRAFT 4D MIDSOLE. The midsole was made with light and oxygen through cutting edge technology by Carbon. Photo from adidas.com

FOR ATHLETES. The Futurecraft 4D is designed to enhance the performance of athletes. Photo from adidas.com

FOR ATHLETES. The Futurecraft 4D is designed to enhance the performance of athletes. Photo from adidas.com

DIGITAL LIGHT SYNTHESIS. The shoe's midsole was crafted through pioneering technology, signaling a new future for footwear manufacturers. Photo from adidas.com

DIGITAL LIGHT SYNTHESIS. The shoe’s midsole was crafted through pioneering technology, signaling a new future for footwear manufacturers. Photo from adidas.com

Learn more about the technology behind the shoe here:

Local sneakerheads who want to get their hands on these babies should get ready to pay USD 300 for a pair. The shoes will launch in the New York City area through Consortium retailers KITH, Packer, and SNS. Visit adidas.com/futurecraft for more information. – Rappler.com

Pack of 2Meters 2GT Open Timing Belt Width=6mm Rubber With Fiberglass Core for 3D Printer CNC

2GT/GT2 Open Timing Belt 2GT-6 Specs:

Type: 2GT-6
GT2 Pitch :2mm
Belt Height:1.38mm
Tooth Height:0.76mm
Material: Neoprene Rubber With Fiberglass Core
Width:6mm
Length:2meters
Shape:Open ended

The Package Listing Includes as Follow:
Quantity:2meters GT2 Open Ended Timing belt

Product Features

  • Compared with the T2.5 or MXL timing pulley, the GT2 pulley tooth profile is anti-backlash
  • Circular arc Tooth Profile Tooth Space is Small, Suitable for Straight Line Driving
  • GT2 pulley with 20 teeth or grooves is one of the best choices for 3d printer construction
  • Fit for Reprap, Prusa, MendelMax,3D Printer
  • It Gives Better Smoothness and Cccuracy of Positioning

Click Here For More Information

HESAI 3D Printer Kit Smart Parts LCD 12864 Display Monitor Motherboard Blue Screen Module for RAMPS 1.4 Controller Control Panel

Specification:

This full graphic Smart Controller contains a SD-Card reader, an rotary encoder and a 128 x 64 dot matrix LCD display. You can easy connect it to your Ramps board using the “smart adapter” included. After connecting this panel to your Ramps you don’t need your pc any more, the Smart Controller supplies power for your SD card. Further more all actions like calibration, axes movements can be done by just using the rotary encoder on the Smart Controller. Print your 3D designs without PC, just with a g-code design stored on the SD card.

Package List:

1x LCD 12864 Smart Controller

1x Smart Adapter

2x FC Cable

Product Features

  • Using a large screen 12864LCD
  • With a SD card base on back, put slicing file into the SD card and select the file on the LCD, then can be printing
  • Product comes encoder parameter adjustment can be achieved, and the file selection print
  • Plug and play on the RAMPS, but need to modify the firmware to support

Visit The Website For More Information…

Aluminum No Match For 3D Printed Press Brake Dies

If you’re looking for a get-rich-quick scheme, you can scratch “Doing small-scale manufacturing of ultralight aircraft” off your list right now. Turns out there’s no money in it. At least, not enough money that you can outsource production of all the parts. Not even enough to setup a huge shop full of customized machining tools when you realize you have to make the stuff yourself. No, this sounds like one of those “labors of love” we always hear so much about.

So how does one do in-house manufacturing of aircraft with a bare minimum of tools? Well, since you’re reading this on Hackaday you can probably guess that you’ve got to come up with something a bit unorthodox. When [Brian Carpenter] of Rainbow Aviation needed a very specific die to bend a component for their aircraft, he decided to try designing and 3D printing one himself.

Printing a die on the Zortrax M200

He reasoned that since he had made quick and dirty dies out of wood in the past, that a 3D printed one should work for at least a few bends before falling apart. He even planned to use JB Weld to fill in the parts of the printed die which he assumed would start cracking and breaking off after he put it through a few cycles. But even after bending hundreds of parts, wear on the dies appears to be nearly non-existent. As an added bonus, the printed plastic dies don’t mar the aluminum pieces they are bending like the steel dies do.

So what’s the secret to printing a die that can bend hundreds of pieces of aluminum on a 20 ton brake without wearing down? As it turns out…not a whole lot. [Brian] attributes the success of this experiment to designing the die with sufficiently accurate tolerances and having so high of an infill that it may as well be solid plastic.

In fact, the 3D printed die worked out so well that they’ve now expanded the idea to a cheap Harbor Freight brake. Before this tool was going more or less unused as it didn’t have features they needed for the production of their parts, namely a radius die or backstop. But by 3D printing these components [Brian] was able to put the tool back to work.

We’ve previously covered the art and science of bending sheet metal, as well as a homebuilt brake that let’s you do it on a budget even Rainbow Aviation would scoff at. So what are you waiting for? Go build an airplane.

Thanks to [Oahupilot] for the tip.