HICTOP 3D Printer Tools Kit 3D Printing Models Clean Up Kit and Removal Tool

Everything needed to print, maintain and clean up 3d model, and replace some parts of 3d printer.
Your knives always stay sharp with this 13 piece knife kit.
Package includes, 13 sharp blades, 3 handles and convenient storage case.
Great for 3D Print Clean-up & Arts and Crafts, change nozzle and removel models.
This kit has everything to make 3D printing easy and the printed results spectacular.

Package:
13pcs sharp blades
3pcs handles
2pcs removal tool
1pcs nozzle sleeve
1pcs pliers

Product Features

  • Quantity: 17-pcs tools with great quality and one year warranty.
  • Multifunction: all kinds of tools for 3d printing and model.
  • Function: This kit has everything to make 3D printing easy and the printed results spectacular.

Click Here If You Need More Detailed Info…

3D printed models of cardiac conduction system could help doctors tackle troublesome heart rhythms

Aug 4, 2017 | By Benedict

Scientists from a number of British and Danish universities have developed a new way to visualize the cardiac conduction system—the process that makes our hearts beat—in 3D. The study, which enables the 3D printing of heart models, could aid research into heart conditions.

Understanding the human heart is a critical area of medical research. By getting to know how the organ behaves, doctors can become better prepared to help us—potentially saving our lives—when the big red ticker goes awry.

New research demonstrates a way of visually representing in 3D the cardiac conduction system, the cells that allow our hearts to beat by generating and distributing a wave of electrical activity that stimulates the heart muscle to contract.

The study, titled “High resolution 3-Dimensional imaging of the human cardiac conduction system from microanatomy to mathematical modelling,” was carried out by scientists at the UK’s Liverpool John Moores University (LJMU), The University of Manchester, and Newcastle University, as well as Denmark’s Aarhus University.

Published in Scientific Reports, the research claims to offer a “much more accurate” framework than ever before, and could ultimately help doctors tackle unusual and dangerous heart rhythms. Atrial fibrillation, one such rhythm, affects 1.4 million people in the UK.

The new 3D data system is able to show exactly where cardiac conduction system is in a normal heart—that happens to be right up close to the aortic valve—but could also be used to gather information about less stable hearts.

“The 3D data makes it much easier to understand the complex relationships between the cardiac conduction system and the rest of the heart,” explains LJMU’s Professor Jonathan Jarvis. “We also use the data to make 3D printed models that are really useful in our discussions with heart doctors, other researchers, and patients with heart problems.”

The researchers say the 3D system could help cardiologists identify the location of the cardiac conduction system in abnormal hearts. This will help surgeons carry out tricky procedures to repair the organ without damaging it.

To obtain 3D data about hearts, post-mortem organs were in a solution of iodine, which makes them able to absorb X-rays. X-rays are then used to collect detailed 3D images on the hearts, identifying the boundaries between single heart cells and detecting the direction in which they are arranged.

The data gathered from these X-rays can be turned into an accurate digital version of the scanned heart, and can even be transformed into a 3D printable model to help surgeons prepare for procedures.

“When the data is presented as 3D images or 3D printed models, it will inform discussions between medical teams and their patients, and aid the education of medical and surgical trainees,” the researchers explain in their paper.

Micro-CT scanning was carried out using the Nikon Metris XTEK 320 kV Custom Bay and Nikon XTEK XTH 225 kV systems at the Manchester X-Ray Imaging Facility at the University of Manchester.

“This is just the beginning,” claims Dr Halina Dobrzynski of the University of Manchester. “The British Heart Foundation is supporting my group to visualize this system in 3D from aged and failing hearts. With my research assistant Andrew Atkinson, and working with Professor Jonathan Jarvis, Robert Stephenson, and others, we will produce families of data from aged and failing hearts in 3D.”

Posted in 3D Printing Application

Maybe you also like:

San Diego researchers cut operation times by 25% with 3D printed hip models

Aug 3, 2017 | By Benedict

Bioengineers from the University of California San Diego and physicians from Rady Children’s Hospital are using 3D printed models to improve surgeries for slipped capital femoral epiphysis, the most common hip disorder found in children ages 9 to 16. Use of models cut surgery time by about 25%.

3D printed hip models helped San Diego surgeons cut operation times by around 25 percent

We see 3D printed medical models so frequently these days, it can be easy to accept their existence without questioning them.

But have you ever wondered just how useful such models can be—in numerical terms? While it makes total sense that a 3D printed model could improve a surgeon’s performance by allowing him or her to practice, sometimes it’s hard to gauge just how much improvement there really is.

That’s what makes a recent study at the University of California San Diego and San Diego’s Rady Children’s Hospital so important.

In the study, researchers created 3D printed models of patient hip joints, to allow surgeons to practice their procedure before doing the real thing.

But they also used a control group, letting a few surgeons perform the procedure without a 3D printed aid to see exactly how much difference the 3D printed models were making.

The study was published in a recent issue of the Journal of Children’s Orthopaedics.

In the study, Dr. Vidyadhar Upasani, pediatric orthopedic surgeon at Rady Children’s and UC San Diego and the paper’s senior author, operated on 10 young patients with slipped capital femoral epiphysis, a common hip disorder that affects about 11 in 100,000 children in the United States every year.

Five of Upasani’s operations were assisted with 3D printed hip models; five were not. Two other surgeons also operated on different groups of five patients, without using 3D printed models.

Excitingly, the results of the study showed 3D printing in a positive light. In the group where Upasani used 3D printed models, surgeries were 38-45 minutes shorter compared with the two control groups.

Student Jason Caffrey helped develop the 3D printed models

And according to the study’s researchers, these time savings would translate into at least $2,700 in savings per surgery.

Given that the kind of 3D printer required for the models would only cost around $2,200, such equipment clearly represents a solid investment—so much so, in fact, that Rady Children’s orthopedics department has already acquired its own.

“Being able to practice on these 3D models is crucial,” Upasani concluded. “It’s now hard to plan surgeries without them.”

To make the 3D printed models, two UC San Diego students, Jason Caffrey and Lillia Cherkasskiy, teamed up with Upasani, bioengineering professor Robert Sah, and their colleagues. They took CT scans of each patient’s pelvis, and used this data to make a computerized model of the bone and growth plate for 3D printing.

Printing took between four and 10 hours for each 3D printed hip model.

When completed, the 3D printed models allowed Upasani to visualize in 3D how the growth plate of each patient was deformed. This allowed him to familiarize himself with the patient’s physiology without using radiation-giving X-rays.

Although this study only focused on one kind of procedure, the speed improvement of 25 percent will be music to the ears of medical 3D printing specialists, and may encourage more hospitals to adopt additive technology.

Posted in 3D Printing Application

Maybe you also like:

Men’s Check Out My ABS Tee 3D Printing Printer Models Funny Pun XL Slate

Product Features

  • A funny pun t-shirt that says “Check Out My ABS”
  • Makes a great gift for friends and family who have a 3D printing and want to show off their ABS plastic I guess. For those folks who love 3D printing, printers, models and funny pun joke things.
  • Lightweight, Classic fit, Double-needle sleeve and bottom hem

Click Here For More Information

Men’s Check Out My ABS Tee 3D Printing Printer Models Funny Pun XL Royal Blue

Product Features

  • A funny pun t-shirt that says “Check Out My ABS”
  • Makes a great gift for friends and family who have a 3D printing and want to show off their ABS plastic I guess. For those folks who love 3D printing, printers, models and funny pun joke things.
  • Lightweight, Classic fit, Double-needle sleeve and bottom hem

Click Here For More Information