[Sintron] 3D Printer Plastic Printed Part Frame Kit for MK8 Extuder Reprap Mendal Prusa i3

This is the excellent and popular version of the Prusa i3 Acrylic Frame 3D Printer, This kit comes with the following parts in PLA. These are the parts you’ll need to complete your Prusa i3, As the picture, what you see will be what you get.

Overview:

PLA, Polylactic Acid, is created from processing a number of plant products.
PLA can be composted at commercial facilities unlike ABS which is derived from fossil fuels, Our fine grade PLA filament (Poly Lactic Acid) is derived from corn starch and is biodegraded in an active compost heap. We recommend PLA for beginners as its more forgiving and easier to work with as it cools & sets faster reducing warpage.

PLA is a more earth friendly plastic. It is stronger and more rigid than ABS, and in general the printed objects will have a more glossy look and feel compared to ABS, unlike ABS, PLA can be sanded and machined.

Features:

(1) PLA has a lower melting temperature compared to ABS.
(2) As a material, PLA has much less warping versus ABS. Additionally, a heated bed is not required to print it.
(3) PLA plastic is a much harder plastic compared to ABS. With PLA your printer will flex less and your gears will last much longer.

Package list:(Bolts and Nuts included)

1 Pcs X carriage for 8mm smooth rod and LM8UU bearings
3 Pcs Clamp style endstop holders
1 Pcs X end idler for 8mm smooth rod and LM8UU bearings
1 Pcs X end motor for 8mm smooth rod and LM8UU bearings
1 Pcs Y belt holder
1 Pcs Y idler bracket
1 Pcs Y motor mount
1 Pcs Extruder mount for MK8 extruder
3 Pcs Y bushings for 8mm smooth rod and LM8UU bearings
4 Pcs Y corners for 8mm threaded rod

Product Features

  • (1) PLA has a lower melting temperature compared to ABS.
  • (2) As a material, PLA has much less warping versus ABS. Additionally, a heated bed is not required to print it.
  • (3) PLA plastic is a much harder plastic compared to ABS. With PLA your printer will flex less and your gears will last much longer.
  • (4) PLA generally enjoys sharper details and corners compared to ABS without the risk of cracking or warping. PLA can also be printed at higher throughput speeds.
  • (5) These are the parts you’ll need to complete your Prusa i3, 17 unit plastic printed Parts with bolts and nuts included.

Visit The Website For More Information…

#4-40 x 0.135″ Qty 50 Threaded Heat-Set Inserts used for connecting 3D printed and injection molded parts.

If you’ve done 3D printing, then you most likely have tried to connect some parts. Perhaps it’s an enclosure for an electronics project and mounting a circuit board to protect it. Maybe it’s a robotics or RC car project. Alternatively, you might be a professional architect or engineer modeling a prototype product. Using screws to tap straight into plastic might work once if the connection does not need to be too strong and doesn’t have to come apart. If you ever need to disassemble and reassemble multiple times, then you need to raise your game to include brass heat-set inserts. Brass inserts have small threads inside that hold #4-40 machine screws tightly. They have ridges and bumps on the outside to allow the melted plastic to wrap around, holding the insert tight into the plastic piece. Using a soldering iron with a special installation tip (search Amazon for B078K72615 ) makes it easy to install the inserts and extract the heated tip consistently without pulling the insert out of the plastic and ruining the part. Once the insert is installed you will have a much more robust and reusable way to connect 3D printed parts.

Product Features

  • Brass inserts help you to connect your 3D printed parts and enclosures.
  • Press into 3D printed parts with heated tip (Virtjoule installation tips ASN: B078K72615 ). Tip with insert on it melts plastic and forms tight bond. You can then use a #4-40 machine screw giving a strong connection.
  • Your 3D printed parts can be more easily assembled and disassembled multiple times. Placing a screw into regular plastic does not hold as well and will likely strip the plastic if done more than once, making it hard to reassemble with any connection strength.
  • With a 0.135″ length, these inserts are short and are most useful for parts that have limited space to mount or connect 3D printed objects. The #4-40 size allows for a small, but useful size machine screw that can be found at most hardware stores.
  • Useful for mounting circuit boards into 3D printed enclosures.

Detailed Information available on our Homepage…

ECCO Steps Forward with 3D Printed Custom Silicone Midsoles

Pin It
Email

German company ViscoTec, which manufactures systems required for conveying, dosing, applying, filling, and emptying medium to high-viscosity fluids for multiple industries, including automotive, medical, and aerospace, is well-known in the 3D printing world for its two-component print head for viscous materials like silicone. The Bavaria-based company, which began working with 3D printing four years ago, employs about 200 people worldwide, and is now putting its print head to the test through a collaboration with Danish heritage footwear brand and manufacturer ECCO.

ECCO, a family-owned business founded in 1963 with factories and subsidiaries in China, Indonesia, Portugal, Slovakia, Thailand, and Vietnam, has a vision of becoming the top premium brand for leather goods and shoes. The latest innovation to be introduced by the Innovation Lab of ECCO is called QUANT-U, an experimental footwear customization project.

QUANT-U relies on three core technologies: real-time analysis, data-driven design, and in-store 3D printing. The project combines these technologies to create custom, personalized midsoles, in just two hours, out of a heat cured two-component silicone.

Most everyone likes personalized products such as shoes, but due to the necessary cost, production time, and expertise involved in making custom footwear, they’re typically not available to everyone. But thanks to ECCO’s partnership with ViscoTec, this is going to change.

3D printing of silicone midsoles with ViscoTec printhead.

In order to specifically coordinate the material properties and the process, ECCO had to rethink its approach to customization, and now plans to utilize ViscoTec’s print head technology and two-component silicone to 3D print customer-specific midsoles for its customers, so each person can enjoy their own tailored fit and comfort.

According to the Innovation Lab ECCO website for QUANT-U, “A midsole is the functional heart of the shoe. It plays a key role in the performance and comfort of your footwear. Two years of research has proven that replacing the standard PU midsoles with 3D printed silicone can tune its inherent properties; viscoelasticity, durability and temperature stability.”

The QUANT-U process has three steps, starting with using scanners and wearable sensors to measure the customer’s feet and build a unique digital footprint. This biomechanical data is then evaluated and interpreted using a sophisticated algorithm, and a unique configuration is generated through structural simulations and machine learning.

This augmented pattern is optimized for each person’s respective feet and activity level by making adjustments to its densities, patterns, and structures, and the final 3D printed midsoles are personalized according to the customer’s own orthopedic parameters for a far more comfortable fit than you’d get with typical store-bought midsoles. Within just a few hours, you’re able to take home your custom 3D printed midsoles, along with your chosen pair of ECCO shoes.

Thermal cross-linking of the individual silicone layers.

By 3D printing the two-component silicone, ECCO is able to optimally counteract the high mechanical stresses we often deal with in everyday life; this is thanks to the midsole’s algorithmic designs combining with the silicone’s unique properties. By utilizing 3D printing, ECCO will be able to fabricate large quantities of personalized midsoles.

Using ViscoTec’s print heads gives ECCO several unique advantages, such as the usage of heat cured two-component silicone and precise 3D printing results, in addition to making sure that the silicone is uniformly mixed in the static mixing tube.

The footwear industry, which often utilizes 3D printing, has been growing fast over the last few years, with its global market expected to reach $371.8 billion by 2020. We often see 3D printed insoles and midsoles available for purchase now, and ECCO’s collaboration with ViscoTec and its unique 3D print head will certainly help keep it in the game.

Discuss this story and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts in the Facebook comments below. 

[Images provided by ViscoTec]

3D printed origami robots that crawl and grab when activated by magnets

A team at MIT’s Department of Mechanical Engineering and Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering have created a set of foldable, 3D printed robots that are doped with magnetic particles that are precisely aligned during printing; when triggered by a control-magnet they engage in precise movements: grabbing, jumping, rolling, squeezing, etc.

The anticipated uses are biomedical: guiding devices through the digestive tract or selectively clamping blood vessels, for example.

MIT Engineers Design Responsive 3D-Printed Structures Remotely Controlled by Magnets [Colossal]

FT Technologies launches Graphite AM 3D printed sensor for drones

FT Technologies, a British company specializing in the development and production of ultrasonic wind sensors, has reportedly launched its first drone-specific and 3D printed device.

The FT205 sensor has been 3D printed by fellow British company Graphite Additive Manufacturing (Graphite AM) a specialist service bureau and consultancy firm.

According to Fred Squire, Director of Sales and Marketing at FT Technologies, “The FT205 is the first in a new generation of lightweight ultrasonic wind sensors,”

“The light weight of the FT205 together with the proven FT Acu-Res Technology make it ideal for use on aerial drones and other applications where weight is critical.”

Hydrophobic coating on an FT Technologies ultrasonic wind sensor. Photo via FT TechnologiesHydrophobic coating on an FT Technologies ultrasonic wind sensor. Photo via FT Technologies

The drone anemometer

The FT205 uses acoustic resonance technology to deliver environmental information about the wind speed, direction and temperature, bases on minute vibrations in the device, and an in-built compass. A versatile piece of equipment, it can be plugged into a drone’s input/output communications, mounted on a flat surface, or attached to a pole.

Selective laser sintering (SLS) technology has been used to make the device, achieving a weight of just 100g. According to reports, the material used is a graphite and nylon composite – potentially Graphite AM’s proprietary carbon fiber reinforced PA.

The device works in extreme environments, at a maximum altitude of 4000m and in temperatures between -20 and +70°C.

All variations of the FT205 anemometer. Photos via FT TechnologiesAll variations of the FT205 anemometer. Photos via FT Technologies

3D printing demand

Recently, Graphite AM invested in a new SLS 3D printer for its EXPRESS track customers helping to fulfill growing demand for the service. The 3D Systems sPro™ SLS® Center was delivered to the premises in January 2018, and has been delivering parts on demand for Formula 1 customers.

Graphite AM also has an existing partnership with bespoke industrial drone manufacturer Vulcan UAV, and has been helping the company with the light weighting of its devices.

FT Technologies’ FT205 is designed to aid drone users in environmental projects and to execute more reliable flights.

Subscribe to the 3D Printing Industry newsletter, follow us on Twitter, and like us on Facebook for more application inspiration and use cases.

Looking for a new career in product development? Look no further – search 3D Printing Jobs now.

Featured image shows a quad drone in flight. Public domain photo via pxhere