Orion Motor Tech Transparent Desktop 3D Printer with All Metal MK8 Extruder Dual Air Vents Windows Mac Linux Compatible

This is a high performance desktop 3D printer that’s perfect for home users, makers, designers, engineers, architects, and anyone looking for an easy-to-use desktop 3D printer. With an acrylic frame, it is light-weight, easy for transport and storage. Tons of upgrades are making our product an amazing deal for those of you who are looking for an entry level but powerful 3D printer. Get one now.

SPECIFICATIONS
Model:A8
Diameter of Extruder: 0.4 mm
Monitor Type: LCD2004
Offline Printing: Supported
Operating Systems: Windows Mac Linux
Operating Temperature: 50 to 86°F
Operating Humidity: 20% to 50%
File Formation: STL G-Code OBJ
Languages Supported: English, Mandarin
Supported Software: Cura

Filament Type: PLA, ABS
Filament Diameter: 1.75 mm
XY Axis Accuracy: 0.012 mm
Z Axis Accuracy: 0.004 mm
Pringting Speed: 10 – 120 mm/s
Pringting Thickness: 0.1 – 0.3 mm

Item Dimensions: 19.6″ x 15.7″ x 17.7″
Item Weight: 16.5 lbs
Package Dimensions: 20″ x 13.6″ x 8.5″
Package Weight: 20.3 lbs

Package includes:
1x 3D Printer (Assembly Required, All Parts Included)
1x Users Manual (included in the USB Flash)

Product Features

  • Large build platform: 220 x 220 x 240 mm. Heated aluminum build plate. Lightweight and sturdy acrylic frame.
  • Upgraded MK8 Extruder for improved accuracy. Dual air vents for better heat dissipation.
  • Assembly instructions: https://youtu.be/J8tX-Kfb1og , https://youtu.be/EB5Q3_sJ-Tk (Also included in the USB flash.)
  • 3D printing requires a lot of enthusiasm, patience and expertise. It may be not that easy, but it’s definitely FUN and REWARDING!
  • LCD screen to display. Button operations increase user friendliness. MicroSD card slot for convenient storing files & direct printing.

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Orion Motor Tech PLA 3D Printer Filament 1.75mm Diameter 1kg 2.2lbs (transparent)

Our Thermoplastic 3D Filaments are made from the best materials available and have been thoroughly tested for the best possible results. PLA materials are extruded with great precision, which means better looking prints, less calibration and fewer extruder failures. The materials will work flawlessly with most 3D extruders currently in the market.

Specification:
Material: PLA
Density 1.25g ± 0.05g/cm³
Melting Point: 180℃ (356°F)
Tensile Strength: ≥60MPa
Bending Strength: ≥60MPa
Notch Impack Strength: 4.53 lbs / ft2
Distortion Temperature: 60℃(140°F)
Printing Temperature: 190°C – 220°C (374°F – 428°F )

Product Features

  • Made of PLA (Polylactic Acid) material of premium quality, no kinks or breaks
  • Work flawlessly with most 3D extruders/printers currently in the market
  • Recommended printing temperature is 190°C – 220°C (374°F – 428°F )
  • Superior materials ensure better looking prints, less calibration & fewer extruder failures

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Orion Motor Tech ABS 3D Printer Filament 1.75mm Diameter 1kg 2.2lbs (white)

Our Thermoplastic 3D Filaments are made from the best materials available and have been thoroughly tested for the best possible results. ABS materials are extruded with great precision, which means better looking prints, less calibration and fewer extruder failures. The materials will work flawlessly with most 3D extruders currently in the market.

Specification:
Material: ABS
Density 1.25g ± 0.05g/cm³
Tensile Strength: ≥ 60MPa
Bending Strength: ≥ 60MPa
Notch Impack Strength: 4.53 lbs / ft2
Melting Point: 390°F / 200°C
Distortion Temperature: 221°F / 105°C
Printing Temperature: 464°F – 500°F / 240°C – 260°C

Product Features

  • Made of ABS (Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene) material, a plastic that is petroleum based. No kinks or breaks
  • Work flawlessly with most 3D extruders/printers currently in the market
  • Recommended printing temperature is 240°C – 260°C (464°F – 500°F )
  • Superior materials ensure better looking prints, less calibration & fewer extruder failures

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Oxfam launches VR film, trials 3D printing and sensor tech

Evelyn watches the Oxfam film, which she stars in, using a Samsung Gear VR headset.

International charity Oxfam is leveraging new technologies to spread the word about crises happening around the globe, as well as exploring the use of 3D printing, drones and internet of things sensors as new ways of delivering aid and solving problems in the developing world.

On Tuesday, Oxfam is set to launch a virtual reality film called Evelyn’s Story, allowing viewers to experience the arduous journey of an 11-year-old Kenyan girl searching for water in the drought-ridden Turkana county.

When Oxfam filmed the short film (which was made in conjunction with the Sydney-based production company Flimgraphics and Alt VFX), the young girl’s family could only get access to clean water for about two hours every eight days, so were often forced to risk diseases such as diarrhoea and cholera, using whatever they could find.

Oxfam Australia director of public engagement, Pam Anders, told The Australian Financial Review it was the first time it had used virtual reality, but if it goes well it will continue to use them to help show what it is trying to achieve.

“Virtual reality is something that’s become more accessible in the past 12 months in terms of people being able to access headsets off the shelf, so it was a great opportunity for us to look at because it gives the viewer an amazing opportunity to be virtually connected,” she said.

“It’s like you’re there. It’s very disorienting when you first put the headset on and you’re able to direct what you see. You can look beyond the subject to see what’s above or behind you. Many of my staff and myself were emotionally moved.”

Inspiring experience

Watching the film in virtual reality, the viewer feels like they’re in the bare, arid desert of northern Kenya desperately searching for water alongside Evelyn. Ms Anders hopes the immersive experience will inspire people to donate more money.

Besides virtual reality, Oxfam has also been utilising new technologies in Nepal and Sri Lanka.

Since the 2015 earthquake in Nepal, the organisation has been trialling 3D printing of water pipes and fittings in partnership with the not-for-profit Field Ready and a local 3D printing company. 

“What we’ve found is it’s been a much quicker way to produce the spare parts. We want to keep doing this, but the challenge now is how to get the right materials locally, so it’s more sustainable and weather-proof, and how to keep the costs low, and where along the chain of vendors it’s best to introduce 3D printing. It’s going well so far, but there are still elements to resolve,” Ms Anders said.

In Sri Lanka, Oxfam has also been placing sensors in dams and water pipes to measure the amount of rainfall in real time. This is helping farmers to make insurance claims during floods. If rainfall hits a certain level in the dam, farmers in the region receive an SMS generated by the sensor.

“One of the problems this was trying to solve was that local insurance schemes were really difficult for farmers to access because they didn’t have evidence of the rainfall or flooding. Since we implemented these sensors there’s been an increase in payouts to farmers – last year there was over 110,000,” Ms Anders said.

Other charities adopting new tech

Oxfam’s use of cutting edge technologies is just one example of ways that not-for-profit and inter governmental organisations are using new-age tech to help tackle problems in developing nations and countries plagued by internal conflict.

In May the United Nation’s World Food Programme concluded a trial using the ethereum blockchain, giving Syrian refugees resources by giving them cryptocurrency-based vouchers to be redeemed in participating markets.

Oxfam’s 2014 Even it Up report found that seven out of 10 people live in countries where the gap between rich and poor is greater than it was 30 years ago. Oxfam has also found that over the last 25 years, the top 1 per cent has gained more income than the bottom 50 per cent put together.

World Vision has also been building up its technology capability and has partnered with US companies Fieldworker and Intermec to build the Last Mile Mobile Solution (LMMS), which helps the charity to register and verify aid beneficiaries, distribute food, prevent duplication errors and reduce inventory losses.

The LMMS devices work in remote locations without electricity or internet access, but let aid beneficiaries register and receive their own barcoded ID card.

The system has let World Vision deliver materials like food, tents, hygiene kits and mosquito nets in up to 50 per cent less time than through manual methods.

J&J buys 3D-printing tech to create bone-healing implants

Johnson & Johnson has acquired 3D-printing technology from Tissue Regeneration Systems. The deal gives J&J’s DePuy Synthes Products unit technology for creating personalized bioabsorbable implants designed to aid the healing of bones.

J&J plans to use the technology to print implants that treat orthopaedic and craniomaxillofacial deformities and injuries. This is in line with TRS’ plans for the technology. TRS, a company with the tag line “giving patients back their smiles,” emerged in 2008 to turn research at the University of Michigan and University of Wisconsin into devices for reconstructing skeletons and regenerating bones.

The resulting technology consists of two elements. One part is the 3D-printing technology itself. TRS bases the geometry of each personalized device on CT scans, resulting in implants that should be a close match for the missing bits of bone. Surgeons can adapt implants in the operating room to make them a better fit.

TRS’ implants use scaffold technology designed to create devices that are porous enough to be integrated into the bone, while remaining strong enough to bear loads while the body is healing. As healing happens, the device is fully replaced by bone.

This process is facilitated by the second element of the technology: A mineral coating. By coating its implants with a “plate-like nanostructure that resembles living bone,” TRS thinks it can support bone regeneration and proliferation. The idea is to provide a surface that autologous cells and growth factors stick to and grow on.

TRS put most of its efforts into developing the technology for use in craniomaxillofacial surgery. Today, surgeons typically treat injuries to the mouth, jaws, face and skull by taking bone from another part of the patient’s body. TRS thinks its implants can eliminate the need to harvest bone grafts and cut the need for midoperation modification by providing surgeons with tailormade devices.

J&J is sufficiently impressed by the potential of the technology to add it to DePuy Synthes’ trauma business, continuing its push into 3D printing.

“We are systematically investing in building a pipeline of 3D printed products,” Ciro Römer, group chairman at DePuy Synthes, said in a statement. “The TRS technology, which will be added to the DePuy Synthes Trauma Platform, is the latest example of how we are working toward developing next-generation technologies that transform healthcare delivery with individualized solutions for patients.”

J&J has penned 50 collaborations to give it a beachhead in the emerging 3D-printing sector. DePuy Synthes’ relationship with TRS began this way. In 2014, TRS was pulled into the global network set up by Johnson & Johnson Innovation and began working with DePuy Synthes.